31 Days Of Family Horror Fun: The Witch

In 1630 a family, William (Ralph Ineson) and Katherine (Kate Dickie), daughter Thomasin (Anya Taylor-Joy), son Caleb (Harvey Scrimshaw) and fraternal twins Mercy (Ellie Grainger) and Jonas (Lucas Dawson) leaves a Puritan Plymouth Colony over a supposed religious dispute. William moves the family to the edge of the woods and build a farm there.

Katherine has a newborn baby named Samuel. One day while Thomasin is playing with Samuel, he disappears. It’s believed that a witch has taken the baby. Katherine falls into despair. Caleb and William go hunting where William tells Caleb he has sold Katherine’s silver cup for hunting supplies. Katherine questions Thomasin about the missing cup believing that she took it and is responsible for Samuel’s disappearance. Katherine discusses with William about sending Thomasin away.

Thomasin and Caleb go hunting and Thomasin falls off her horse and gets knocked unconcious while Caleb chases after a rabbit with the family dog. Caleb finds the dog dead and then sees a witch in the woods. William finds Thomasin and brings her home. Later Caleb shows up naked and sick.

He eventually succumbs to whatever he has caught and the twins accuse Thomasin of being a witch. She in turn accuses the twins of conversing with the family goat. William locks the three of them in the barn.

Director Robert Eggers has crafted a tense slow building thriller that is an excellent horror movie. .


A MESSAGE TO OUR READERS The coronavirus pandemic is a moment of reckoning for our community. We’re all hurting. It’s no different at Planet S, where COVID-19 has wiped out advertisements for events, businesses and restaurants as Saskatoon and Saskatchewan hunker down in quarantine. As an ad-supported newspaper already struggling in a destabilized media landscape, this is devastating. We’re hoping you, our loyal readers, can help fill in the gap so Planet S can not only continue to exist but even expand our coverage — both in print and online. Please consider donating, either one-time or, even better, on a monthly basis.

We believe Planet S’ unique voice is needed, now more than ever. For 17 years, this newspaper has been a critical part of Saskatoon’s social, cultural and democratic infrastructure. Don’t let us fade away. There’s only one Planet S. If it’s destroyed, it’s never coming back.