31 Days Of Family Horror Fun: The Brood

Nola Carveth (Samantha Eggar) is fighting her husband Frank (Art Hindle) for custody of their five-year-old daughter Candice (Cindy Hinds). Nola has been seeing psychotherapist Dr. Hal Raglan (Oliver Reed) who believes in a new technique called “psychoplasmics” where the patient is supposed to let go of suppressed feelings and let them manifest as physiological changes to their bodies.

Frank wants to cease Nola’s visitation rights when he finds scratches and bruises on Candice. He tells Dr. Raglan this who in turn intensifies his treatments with Nola. Frank wants to find out if Dr. Raglan is a quack and questions some of his former patients.
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31 Days Of Family Horror Fun: The Witch

In 1630 a family, William (Ralph Ineson) and Katherine (Kate Dickie), daughter Thomasin (Anya Taylor-Joy), son Caleb (Harvey Scrimshaw) and fraternal twins Mercy (Ellie Grainger) and Jonas (Lucas Dawson) leaves a Puritan Plymouth Colony over a supposed religious dispute. William moves the family to the edge of the woods and build a farm there.

Katherine has a newborn baby named Samuel. One day while Thomasin is playing with Samuel, he disappears. It’s believed that a witch has taken the baby. Katherine falls into despair. Caleb and William go hunting where William tells Caleb he has sold Katherine’s silver cup for hunting supplies. Katherine questions Thomasin about the missing cup believing that she took it and is responsible for Samuel’s disappearance. Katherine discusses with William about sending Thomasin away.
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31 Days Of Family Horror Fun: Get Out

There’s something scary about meeting your girlfriend’s parents for the first time.

For Chris Washington (Daniel Kaluuya), an aspiring black photographer is going upstate for the weekend to meet his white girlfriend’s Rose Armitage (Allison Williams) parents.

Rose’s parents live in a large estate, her father Dean Armitage (Bradley Whitford) is a neurosurgeon and her mother Missy (Catherine Keener) is a hypnotherapist. Rose’s brother Jeremy (Caleb Landry Jones) is also at the house.
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31 Days Of Family Horror Fun: The Bad Seed

Kenneth (William Hopper) and Christine Penmark (Nancy Kelly) love their eight-year-old daughter Rhoda (Patty McCormack). Rhoda appears to a normal child but she is anything but. Kenneth is in the military and goes away on assignment. When neighbour Monica (Evelyn Varden) comes over with gifts for Rhoda, Rhoda tells her about how she lost a penmanship medal to another kid in class. Monica laughs off the lose but Rhoda is clearly furious about it.

Later Christine and Monica are having lunch when they hear a child drowned at school picnic. Fearing it might be Rhoda Christine races to the scene to find the Rhoda is fine. The victim turns out to be the boy who won the penmanship medal. Later Rhoda’s teacher comes over to talk to Christine about Rhoda. The teacher says that Rhoda was the last person seen with the boy and his medal is missing. The boys parents come over demanding to talk to Rhoda to find out what happened. Christine sends everyone away. The teacher tells Christine that Rhoda isn’t welcome back to school.
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31 Days Of Family Horror Fun: Eyes Without A Face

A woman drives up to a riverbank and dumps a body of a woman in the river. Later Doctor Génessier (Pierre Brasseur) identifies the body of as his daughter Christiane Génessier (Édith Scob).

Christiane was in a terrible car accident which left her face disfigured. Doctor Génessier says that Christiane was depressed and commited suicide.
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31 Days Of Family Horror Fun: The Omen

American diplomat Robert Thorn (Gregory Peck) and his wife Katherine (Lee Remick) are expecting their first child while in Rome. It’s a dark and stormy night and Robert is given some very bad news. Father Spiletto (Martin Benson) tells Robert that his son was born stillborn. The good father tells Robert that another baby was born this night and the mother passed away and they can substitute this baby for his and his wife need never know that her baby died. Robert agrees.

Soon Robert is made the American ambassador to Britain and he moves Katherine and Damien (Harvey Spencer Stephens) to England. Strange things start to happen around Damien. A large black dog appears. At his birthday party his nanny hangs herself in front of everyone. The new nanny, Mrs. Baylock (Billie Whitelaw), is even creepier. A priest, Father Brennan (Patrick Troughton), appears and tries to warn the family about Damien.
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31 Days Of Family Horror Fun: The Hills Have Eyes

The Carter family are on vacation and are travelling from Ohio to California. Along for the trip is Big Bob Carter (Russ Grieve), his wife Ethel (Virginia Vincent), their children Bobby and Brenda (Robert Houston, Susan Lanier), the oldest daughter Lynne (Dee Wallace), her husband Doug (Martin Speer) and their baby Katy.

The Carter’s are travelling by car – a station wagon with a trailer pulled behind. While passing through Nevada Big Bob wants to take a short cut through some dirt roads. Stopping at a gas station owned by an old timer named Fred (John Steadman) Big Bob asks directions. Fred warns them not to take the dirt road.
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31 Days Of Family Horror Fun: The Others

It’s 1945 and Grace Stewart (Nicole Kidman) has just hired three new servants for her house out in the country. Grace lives there with her two children Anne and Nicholas (Alakina Mann, James Bentley). The children have a rare disease which makes them extremely sensitive to light. The new servants, Mrs. Bertha Mills (Fionnula Flanagan), gardener Edmund Tuttle (Eric Sykes), and a mute girl named Lydia (Elaine Cassidy) claim to have worked at the house years earlier. Grace shows them the ground rules.

Grace’s husband is away for the war and Grace is starting to fear that there may be “others” in the house with them.
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31 Days Of Family Horror Fun: A Quiet Place

Most of Earth’s human and animal population have been wiped out by mysterious blind aliens that hunt by sound. The Abbott family have been trying to survive. While on a scavenging trip to a town, Lee Abbott (John Krasinski, who also directs), his wife Evelyn (Emily Blunt) and their children deaf Regan (Millicent Simmonds), Marcus (Noah Jupe) and the youngest Beau (Cade Woodward) looks for supplies in a store.

The family all communicate using sign language so the creatures aren’t alerted to their presence. Beau finds an electronic toy which Leon their e tells him is too noisy and won’t let him bring. As everyone leaves Regan hands the toy back to Beau who puts the batteries back in it. On their walk back Beau turns on the toy with horrifying results.
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REVIEW: Planet of the Monos

Colombian cinema is having a moment. Not only the local industry has an auteur in its hands –Ciro Guerra, director of Embrace of the Serpent and Birds of Passage— a second one has emerged fully formed from Sundance Labs: Alejandro Landes.

In Monos, Landes zeroes in on a group of teenagers recruited by the local revolutionary army to protect an American woman (Julianne Nicholson, August, Osage County) they keep hostage. The rebels expect a handsome paycheck in exchange for the prisoner, so her wellbeing is a priority.

Things start going south almost immediately when the expected source of protein –a cow– succumbs under a hail of bullets. With little supervision or boundaries, the squad crumbles under the weight of responsibilities, power plays and a warped understanding of discipline. The fact they’re armed to the teeth makes their volatility lethal.

Monos doesn’t take the traditional route of the child-soldier subgenre. Each character is more than their circumstances; the atmosphere is oppressive, but there are laughs to be had and beauty to be taken in (the jungle setting amplifies the drama tenfold). Nicholson is superb as the sullen, scared hostage, same as Moises Arias (The Kings of Summer) as Bigfoot, an ambitious foot soldier who craves power but doesn’t understand the concept of leadership.

The film unfolds swiftly as the Monos squad has no notion of teamwork and breaks down at every corner. That said, I would have liked to spend more time with the teens: Each one seems to carry a story worth telling. Still, the one we actually get is worth the price of admission. Three and a half planets.

Monos is now playing at the Roxy in Saskatoon.