REVIEW: ‘Wonder Woman 1984’: Come for the Hero, Stay for the Villains

Wonder Woman saves the day while Steve Trevor watches.

There’s something to be said for DC and Warner’s willingness to pivot. Wonder Woman’s 2017 solo adventure—still set in the Snyder-verse—was hamstrung by continuity and the darker tone that characterized the DC cinematic universe early on. Freed from those shackles, Wonder Woman 1984 is a better rounded and more accomplished film with an openness reminiscent of Sam Raimi’s first two Spider-Man movies (the third is a masterpiece of unintentional comedy, but that’s neither here nor there).

The tonal inconsistencies are still here (the comedy is forced and basic), but overall Wonder Woman 1984 is more successful than the first. More adventurous, even.

Set over 65 years after the events of Wonder Woman, the sequel finds Diana Prince employed at the Smithsonian in Washington, still moping for Steve Trevor (Chris Pine) who sacrificed himself for the sake of London in the waning days of WWI. Diana moonlights as a superhero, the kind that doesn’t kill villains and doesn’t want to be photographed (despite her shiny red, gold and blue suit).

(Very mild spoilers ahead)

Diana’s ennui is shaken by an archeological discovery, a stone that grants wishes. Hot on its tracks is Maxwell Lord (Pedro Pascal channeling Tony Robbins), an entrepreneur on the verge of public humiliation and jail. Desperation is a powerful motivator, and the combination of an oily salesman and a monkey paw turns out to be world-threatening. Think of an ultra-expensive edition of Wishmaster.

The film starts with a short trip to Themyscira, in which a young Diana learns about accepting defeat. The lesson is unfortunately reminiscent of The Phantom Menace’s pod race, but it comes in handy.

Never mind the heavy handed Cold War references and Eighties-on-steroids setting, Wonder Woman 1984 has more realistic heroism than other superhero movies. Sure, the massive set pieces are there, but the acts that make the biggest difference are small in scope.

There are a few problems that prevent the film from being a smooth ride. First is the return of Steve Trevor (not a big spoiler since he’s in all the WW84 trailers) and the comedy bit with the fanny pack. Chris Pine is a good sport, but he can’t give the character consistency: At times, he adjusts quickly to his new surroundings but then he’s helpless the very next scene.

Gal Gadot’s Wonder Woman is a great physical performer but scenes that require emoting reveal her shortcomings as an actor. In fact, the film suffers whenever Pedro Pascal and Kristen Wiig — the charismatic villains — aren’t on screen. Pascal in particular is excellent as the sleazy, charming Maxwell Lord. So good, you’re never rooting against him.

Wonder Woman 1984‘s feminism is showy—nearly every man is a horndog or a predator, with the exception of, you guessed it, Steve Trevor. It’s becoming a cliché (see also Birds of PreyThe CraftPromising Young Woman). Director Patty Jenkins has leveraged journeyman competence into a blockbuster career—she’ll be helming the next Star Wars movie, Rogue Squadron—but you can’t say the filmmaker has delivered on these opportunities. Regardless, Wonder Woman 1984 sits pretty in the top tier of DCCU movies. One has to applaud a film whose main message is to have faith in people in a year when it often feels like humans couldn’t be any more disappointing. Three stars out of five.

Wonder Woman 1984 opens Christmas Day in theatres and on demand.